2016 Recipes

Feta Cheese

Gouda Cheese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derek got me a cheese-making kit for Christmas. I started out the new year trying to put it to good use.

Greek & Belgian Style Feta

Ingredients

 

1 1/2 gallons Whole Goat or Cow Milk, (Can be raw or store-bought pasteurized milk.*)

1/8 teaspoons Mesophilic Culture

1/4 teaspoon Lipase Powder, (Omit for Belgian Style of mild feta.)

1/4 teaspoons Liquid Rennet, diluted in 1/2 cup water

3 tablespoons 3 Tbsp. Cheese Salt or Kosher Salt

Method

1. Preparation (OMIT THIS STEP for mild, Belgian style feta) For Greek style feta only: Make brine by combining 1/2 cup Kosher salt with 1/2 gallon of water. Boil and cool to below room temperature.

2. In a "double boiler" pot set up  warm the milk to 86°F (90° for cow milk.) Or, if preferred, you may use your sink. Submerse the pot with milk into hot water and remove it to the counter once it reaches the proper temperature. Note: You may have to place it back into the hot water later in the process.

3. Again, for Greek-style feta only add the culture and lipase. (Lipase is the enzyme that gives Greek feta its great flavor.)

4. Stir well and let ripen covered, for 1 hour, keeping milk at 86°F (90° for cow milk.)

5. Add rennet and stir briskly for 15 seconds I then recommend "stopping " the milk from moving by inserting your ladle straight up and down. Cover and let set 30 to 40 minutes, or until you get a "clean break". You can check for a clean break by sticking your finger, knife, or thermometer into the curd at an angle. Pull straight up out of the curd; if the curd breaks

cleanly around the knife, and whey runs into the crack that is made, you have a "clean break." Cut the curd into 1/2” pieces. Cutting the curds can be the most confusing part, but don’t worry; it does not have to be perfect.

6. Using a long knife, held vertically, cut 1/2” slices in the curds Then turn the pot by 90° and cut across in 1/2” slices the other direction, making a kind of checkerboard pattern. Now hold the knife at a sideways 45° angle and retrace your cuts. Turn the pot 1/4 turn and retrace your cuts. Turn it again and cut, followed by one final turn and cut. By this time, you probably won’t be able to see 'the original cuts; just do the best you can. If you don’t think you cut the curd perfectly, don’t worry!

7. Let the curds rest for 10 minutes Do not stir yet! After this rest period, stir the curd gently and cut any pieces that you missed when you first cut the curd. (Don’t worry about being too perfect.) Hold the curd at 86°F (90° for cow milk) for 45 minutes, carefully stirring every 10 minutes to prevent the curd from sticking together. This process of "cooking" the curd helps the curd "toughen up," as well as releases its whey.

8. Place a big colander over a big pot and line the colander with a large piece of dampened butter muslin. (This helps the cloth stay in place.) Carefully pour the curd into the colander.

9. Tie corners of cheesecloth together & hang bag to drain After 2 1/2 hours, take the cheese down and turn it over in the cheesecloth (top turned to bottom). This turning will even up the cheese into a nice form. If you don’t turn it, you will have a rough side to the cheese; it's still edible, just not as attractive!

10. After your cheese has hung for a total of 24 hours remove from the cloth and cut into usable size cubes or blocks (about 2-3 inches). Sprinkle all the sides of the cubes with kosher salt and place in a sterilized, large, sealable, container. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 2-3 days to “harden up” the blocks. (Note: The blocks will continue to release whey.)

11. Transfer the blocks and their whey to a large sterilized glass container. Add the brine. Age for at least 1 week before use to allow the full flavor to develop.

Gouda Cheese

Ingredients

 

1 gallon Whole Goat or Cow Milk, (Can be raw or store-bought pasteurized milk.*)

1/8 teaspoons Mesophilic Culture, in 1/4 cup of water

1/2 teaspoons Liquid Rennet, diluted in 1/4 cup water

1 pound Cheese Salt, for brine

 

Method

1. In a "double boiler" pot set up  warm the milk to 90°  Or, if preferred, you may use your sink. Submerse the pot with milk into hot water and remove it to the counter once it reaches the proper temperature. Note: You may have to place it back into the hot water later in the process.

 

2. Add the culture and let the milk ripen for 10 minutes

 

3. Add rennet and stir gently with an up and down motion for 1 minute. Cover and let set at 90° for 1 hour or until it gives a clean break.

 

4. Using a long knife, held vertically, cut 1/2” slices in the curds Then turn the pot by 90° and cut across in 1/2” slices the other direction, making a kind of checkerboard pattern. Now hold the knife at a sideways 45° angle and retrace your cuts. Turn the pot 1/4 turn and retrace your cuts. Turn it again and cut, followed by one final turn and cut. By this time, you probably won’t be able to see 'the original cuts; just do the best you can. If you don’t think you cut the curd perfectly, don’t worry!

 

5. Let the curds rest for 5 minutes Do not stir yet! After this rest period, stir the curd gently and cut any pieces that you missed when you first cut the curd. (Don’t worry about being too perfect.) Let rest another 10 minutes. Drain off 1/3 of the whey. Stirring continuously, add enough 175° water to raise the curd temperature to 92°

 

6. Occasionally stir the curd during the next 10 minutes Drain the whey to the level of the curds. Slowly add 175° water to bring the curd to 100° Keep the curd at 100° for 15 minutes while stirring often to keep the curds from matting. Then let set for 45 minutes.

 

7. Pour off remaining whey Place warm curds in a cheese mold lined with cheese cloth and press at 20# of pressure of 20 minutes. Remove from mold and cheesecloth, turn over, redress, and press, 20# for 12 hours. turn over and do 20# for an additional 12 hours. Remove from press

 

8. Make a saturated brine solution soak the cheese in brine for 3 hours. Remove from brine and pat dry. Reserve the brine for later.

 

9. Air dry the cheese at 50° for 3 weeks Rub the cheese daily with a cloth soaked in lightly salted water.

 

10. Wax the cheese (optional) and age at 50° for 3-4 months, turning it 3 to 4 times a week. For a real treat, age for 6-9 months.

Source: Home Cheese Making - Ricki Carroll